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March 01 2015

19:04
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breathtakingdestinations:

Waterton Lakes National Park - Canada (von AlbertaScrambler)

Reposted frombun bun
19:03

Intelligence is such a turn on.

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19:01
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19:01

Memories are a bitch.

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19:00
I am who I am. your approval is not needed.
— Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
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19:00
A woman sitting by herself is not waiting for you.
— Caitlin Stasey (via renloras)
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19:00

anditslove:

I really, really, really don’t like being lied to. Hurt me with the truth, don’t kill me with your lies.

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18:59
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skunkbear:

How loud is the U. S.*? Researchers from the National Park Service, led by Kurt Fristrup, shared these sound maps at a conference on Monday.

Ten years ago, Fristrup set out to measure an important natural resource - the amount of silence in national parks. He eventually realized it would take forever to actually make recordings throughout all the parks, so he used a computer program to model loudness across the country.

He uploaded all the audio he already had (over a million hours of sound from 546 recording sites) along with environmental data - proximity to roads, the type of vegetation, any nearby topographical features that might act as sound barriers etc. The computer “learned” how all these factors interacted to create a specific sound level, and then predicted loudness everywhere.

The map of all sound roughly follows population density, though there are many uninhabited places that are still loud because they are near major roads or airplane routes.

Far more interesting to me is the map of natural sounds. What happens when you subtract all of humanity’s noise? You are left with rushing rivers, crashing waves, wind in trees … and in the mountain desert, near silence.

A lot of natural soundscapes have been severely degraded, but Fristrup told me there is a more important takeaway from this kind of research: there are lots of things we can do to decrease noise pollution in nature and in our communities.

Images: Dan Mennitt, Kurt Fristrup - National Park Service

*with apologies to Alaska and Hawaii

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Americanlover
18:54
Americanlover
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Americanlover
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Americanlover
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Americanlover
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Americanlover
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Forty Bema
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18:42
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pixieorsomething:

same goes for your whole life tbh

Reposted fromcupKaek cupKaek viahydrosphere hydrosphere
Americanlover
18:41
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Reposted fromlatencja latencja viacheshiresmile cheshiresmile
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